We really are better off than most. When you hear of typhoons or even big rains in many places in Asia it usually includes body counts and millions in losses. Here in Hong Kong we are rather used to typhoons. But there are many who live in lower lying areas and they suffer badly. Not to mention the street dwellers who lose their only possessions in the torrential rains. Churches and government centers are opened to give shelter. this is something maybe not seen in many cities. Hong Kong is a city of sky scrappers. I lived in one most of my adult life. When the storms came I would put tape across the windows and place rags arounds the windows incase there was flooding. For the past several years I have lived in a village on an outlying island. Here we often get the first blow of the storm. Why did I put a very portable shed on my roof? Well, on a sunny day after I moved in I discovered I had way too much stuff: a clothes drier (from a larger prior residence) and a refrigerator that was not needed in this place. Also a washing machine that was on its last legs but I could still use to wash dogs' blankets.

It is a very useful shed. Easy to build;clicks in place. But in the typhoon I have found myself chasing it across the roof where it is placed. You see, Hong Kong does not allow these sheds to be anchored down. So, I load it up with whatever I can and tie it shut...and listen for the wind to move it.

Typhoons deliver sudden thrusts of wind. After each such wind I run up to the roof and inspect. The door is ajar, then the roof staring to un-click. I put it back and run downstairs. In the last storm after such emergency repair I ran in the rain to the house door only to slip and slam my head on the door. My left eye has some detached areas likely from that. Other than floaters I can see very well.