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    Sample from the Novel:

    The Flute Player from Urumqi

     

    By Jeffrey Carnett 鄭文祺

    Ayse Altay, a 22 year old Turkic Muslim woman struggles to find the balance of tradition and surviving in China. She is unmarried and pregnant. Her community shuns her and her lover is determined to destroy her people. The saga that unfolds changes her life and the whole Nation.

    Chapter One

     

    Chapter One

    Outside Urumqi, East Turkestan

    (Xinjiang, Western China)

    2028

    The men unsaddle the horses and stand at the doorway, nostrils flaring wide to breathe in the air our people have enjoyed for thousands of years. The women make final arrangements of putting out the plates and pouring the tea. The biggest and loudest woman of our village takes pride in her role as she calls the men, who rush to wash their hands of gunpowder stains and horse dander. They gather around the fire to exchange stories of the day’s combat and struggle. They are all my kin, so they have not forgotten about me but certainly do not think of me. I stay in a much smaller house, colorless save for a collection of worn rectangular prayer rugs that give me just enough space to sit and sleep.

    “You hungry, Ayşe?” Auntie Elif says.

    “Yes, I’m always able to eat.”

    “I’ll bring some yogurt and bread, then.” She opens the door flaps of my house. I hear her steps getting farther from my house and stomping into the kitchen shed nearby. I strain to hear the comments of the other women when she arrives. I want to know what will they say about my unborn baby and me. Actually, I have heard all their comments before.

    “Ayşe can pray all she wants but she is not married to this, this, man – the father of her child,” the oldest lady says.

    “She brings shame to our people,” another says. “Imagine a bastard child in our pious clan.”

    “You won’t accept the father, so what can I do?” But they can’t hear me. I didn’t plan to get pregnant this way. I never imagined having sex before marriage with anyone − it is against our religion and our traditions. I never imagined having a baby this way. It was love. He was a Communist but He was different. He was charming. But he was an enemy of my people. But it happened. I thought long and hard but I will keep my baby. I will reunite with the father of my child, somehow. I know we can be a family. We can be happy.

    Elif pushes aside the thick leather flap that hangs over the entrance to my house. I have laid out a large cotton sheet to cover the exposed dirt floor between the tattered prayer rugs. I hope for enough food to settle my burning stomach. She places out a covered ceramic bowl of yogurt on the floor. “I don’t know what your father will do to you when he gets back.”

    “If he gets back,” I mumble.

    Elif gives me a piercing glare. She shakes her head in disapproval then spoons the thick yogurt on the plate. I recognize my father’s stern look in her eyes.

    My father can be a distant, harsh man, but he can be kind, at times. Growing up, I loved being with Father. I miss holding his calloused hand even now, as twenty-three-year-old woman. I remember, when I was a child, he took me to the far west of our country.

    End of Excerpt

     

     

    UPDATE:

    23 April 2019

    This book contains topics that have been considered banned by the Chinese Government. It is advised not to be in possession of this book while in The People's Republic of China. READER BEWARE. Since the publication of this novel, the author has needed to relocate out of China for his own safety and to maintain freedom of expression.

    Chapter One

     

    Chapter One

    Outside Urumqi, East Turkestan

    (Xinjiang, Western China)

    2028

    The men unsaddle the horses and stand at the doorway, nostrils flaring wide to breathe in the air our people have enjoyed for thousands of years. The women make final arrangements of putting out the plates and pouring the tea. The biggest and loudest woman of our village takes pride in her role as she calls the men, who rush to wash their hands of gunpowder stains and horse dander. They gather around the fire to exchange stories of the day’s combat and struggle. They are all my kin, so they have not forgotten about me but certainly do not think of me. I stay in a much smaller house, colorless save for a collection of worn rectangular prayer rugs that give me just enough space to sit and sleep.

    “You hungry, Ayşe?” Auntie Elif says.

    “Yes, I’m always able to eat.”

    “I’ll bring some yogurt and bread, then.” She opens the door flaps of my house. I hear her steps getting farther from my house and stomping into the kitchen shed nearby. I strain to hear the comments of the other women when she arrives. I want to know what will they say about my unborn baby and me. Actually, I have heard all their comments before.

    “Ayşe can pray all she wants but she is not married to this, this, man – the father of her child,” the oldest lady says.

    “She brings shame to our people,” another says. “Imagine a bastard child in our pious clan.”

    “You won’t accept the father, so what can I do?” But they can’t hear me. I didn’t plan to get pregnant this way. I never imagined having sex before marriage with anyone − it is against our religion and our traditions. I never imagined having a baby this way. It was love. He was a Communist but He was different. He was charming. But he was an enemy of my people. But it happened. I thought long and hard but I will keep my baby. I will reunite with the father of my child, somehow. I know we can be a family. We can be happy.

    Elif pushes aside the thick leather flap that hangs over the entrance to my house. I have laid out a large cotton sheet to cover the exposed dirt floor between the tattered prayer rugs. I hope for enough food to settle my burning stomach. She places out a covered ceramic bowl of yogurt on the floor. “I don’t know what your father will do to you when he gets back.”

    “If he gets back,” I mumble.

    Elif gives me a piercing glare. She shakes her head in disapproval then spoons the thick yogurt on the plate. I recognize my father’s stern look in her eyes.

    My father can be a distant, harsh man, but he can be kind, at times. Growing up, I loved being with Father. I miss holding his calloused hand even now, as twenty-three-year-old woman. I remember, when I was a child, he took me to the far west of our country.

    End of Excerpt

     

     

    UPDATE:

    23 April 2019

    This book contains topics that have been considered banned by the Chinese Government. It is advised not to be in possession of this book while in The People's Republic of China. READER BEWARE. Since the publication of this novel, the author has needed to relocate out of China for his own safety and to maintain freedom of expression.

  • The Blog

    The expansionism of the Chinese Communist Party is not new.

     

    I've been warning about Chinese Communist Party for years. I even wrote a novel about it. I was told that China is a 'modern country' with 'chop sticks and fortune cookies'. I wrote a novel about the collapse of the CCP and i was told that was ridiculous. Maybe it was. Looking at the World in this COVID19 pandemic (What I prefer to call Wuhan Flu), we can see the free world genuflexion in obedience to the CCP. This is not new.

     

    In 1949 the CCP gained control of the Mainland of China. This followed the brutal colonialisation of Japan in WWII and before that, the humiliation of the last Empire by Western forces who raped and pillaged the country of its resources. The West has nothing to be proud of in its dealings with the Middle Kingdom.

    The Qing Empire was succeeded by the Republic of China. Its leader was Generalisemo Chiang Kai Shek. He was a wealthy man with roots in the rich of China. His fight against Japan was feeble whereas the Communists, under many including Mao Tse Tung, Zhuhai De, Zhou En Lai and Deng Xiao Ping saw that the peasants, who were the most opperessed needed a champion. The party gained their support easily.

     

    Only people in hk agreed with me.

    China is full of guns used for crime. Criminals all ex military.

    Chinese on mainland brainwashed. As long as they have food and money they dont care. HK different since Had education free of propaganda until now. Hk govt all locals who want to kiss ccp ass. US should strip special trade status for hk. They say riots all set up by cia but want US benefits.

    Ccp has this power since westrn countries want cheap goods and the likes of walmart apple microsoft etc make stuff there. US wants to sell to them. US will never stand up to ccp as long as the businessmen and farmers see benefit of china market. China knows this

     

    Well the way I see it, the COVID19 virus was weaponised in Wuhan, rebased according to a plan. Whistle blowers punished/killed. Millions of Chinese died but in the big picture the CCP has never worried about death. During the Great Leap Forward (45 Million) and Cultural Revolution (20 million)...
    I am amazed at the lack of commentary on the concentration camps in Xinjiang and the stripping of freedoms in Hong Kong are getting by authors. So many famous writers who profit from stories of Asia and the Asian experience as silent on condemnation of abuses of human rights by the regime in...
    I was a member in 1970's At that time the goal was to help PRC gain recognition. I was even a delegate to the National meeting in 1979. The goals of the Association were good as there other "China" on Taiwan was a brutal dictatorship blocking recognition of the people in the mainland and their...
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